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  • easyJet pilot faced ‘CRITICAL’ mid-air situation after passenger choked on sandwich

    Yesterday, the express.co.uk reported how an easyJet pilot was forced to keep a cool head after one of his passengers lost consciousness during takeoff, after it was revealed in a documentary.

    ITV’s “easyJet: Inside The Cockpit” highlighted how cabin crew quickly reacted to alert the pilot of the emergency.

    The narrator detailed last month: “Just 10 minutes into the flight, a passenger travelling alone has lost consciousness.

    “In critical situations like this, the cabin crew must alert the cockpit straight away, giving them time to prepare for a medical diversion if needed.

    “But for now it is a waiting game while cabin manager Rebecca monitors the woman’s condition.

    Cabin crew reacted quickly to the situation

    n critical situations like this, the cabin crew must alert the cockpit straight away, giving them time to prepare for a medical diversion if needed

    “Any deterioration and captain Phil and his 186 passengers could be making a very swift return to the UK.”

    The woman soon regained consciousness but continued to concern staff as she failed to convincingly recall where she was and what happened.

    Eventually, they get to the bottom of the situation, with the passenger revealing she choked on a sandwich.

    The narrator adds “36,000 feet above the channel en route to Palma, Captain Philip Ash and First Officer Tom Parker have just been informed they have a sick passenger on board.

    “The cause of the passenger’s condition remains uncertain. A diversion is still on the cards.

    “But in the cabin, new information is emerging – the passenger has been able to speak to cabin manager Rebecca and a nurse who happens to be on board has assessed her.

    “Cabin manager Rebecca reported back to the cockpit and with sandwichgate behind them, next stop Palma.”

    Thankfully the plane made it to Palma and the passenger made a full recovery from the incident.

    However, Captain Phillip revealed why it is necessary for pilots to deal with these situations with the utmost solemnity.

    He said: “We take what the cabin crew say verbatim.

    “They’re on the front line with the sick passenger and they’ve got the best tools to analyse what we need to do.”