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Erdington Care Home
  • Erdington Care Home

    Daughters remove Dad from Care Home after he choked on cake

    A family removed their dad from a care home after they claim he ‘almost died’ from choking on a piece of cake.

    Ken Burrows, 72, was rushed to hospital on with aspiration pneumonia after the food allegedly became clogged in his airway. He survived but never returned to the home where he had lived for five years.

    His Daughter alleges her dad, who has a rare form of dementia called Pick’s Disease, almost died after he was given a slice of cake to eat without supervision.

    The family claim they had raised concerns over Ken eating alone just a week and a half before the incident which they claim left Ken hospitalised.

    Ken Burrows pictured with a packet of crisps at – though his family say he was only ‘supposed to eat soft foods’

    “One day we turned up and saw that he was eating alone,” his daughter claims.

    “I phoned the nurse, questioned it, she said she’d look into it. The nurse had basically said because the Speech and Language Therapist assessment was over six months old, they review it themselves and my dad was ‘fine eating’. So we left it.”

    The sisters were one of three families who lodged complaints about the service, which, alongside ‘whistleblowing’, sparked a Care Quality Commission inspection in July this year.

    The care home is now under new management and is working to address safety concerns as part of its conditions. Improvements are said to be under way, including developing risk assessments and training staff in infection control.

    During the Care Quality Commission inspection in July, the report said staff were not following guidance correctly on specific food items and had ‘failed’ to supervise a resident who was at risk of choking.

    Placing ‘people at risk of harm’ by flouting guidance on specific food items or failing to supervise certain residents at meal times was among the failures listed in the damning report.

    Part of the Care Quality Commission inspector’s report, published on September 16, read: “Where guidelines were in place to support people who were at risk when eating and drinking, they were not followed through in practice, placing people at risk of harm.

    “Guidelines were in place the specific food items not to be given to this person. However, staff were not following these correctly.”

    Referring to another resident, the inspector noted: “The person was assessed as needing supervision during meal times because of the risks, but staff failed to do this.”

    The care home is now under new management and is working to address safety concerns as part of its conditions. Improvements are said to be under way, including developing risk assessments and training staff in infection control.

    Source: Birmingham Mail